The definitive guide to Turkish Coffee

I know. I know. I said Greek and Turkish coffee were exactly the same. They are. And I’ve already posted a how to on Greek Coffee. But then this Turkish guy named Mustafa Arat from Turkish Coffee World wrote this guide for Bean Scene. And I thought “hey, you can’t have too much good information about coffee.

Cool fact about coffee: The word for “breakfast” in Turkish means “before coffee”.


Image Credit: Bean Scene

Here’s a quick history of Turkish Coffee (skipping over its discovery in Ethiopia, and initial brewing methods:

“Eventually its [coffee’s] fame reached the center of Ottoman cuisine in Istanbul, where the imperial cooks and the metropolitan elites had a tradition of bringing together elements of regional cuisines from across the empire. It was a place to experiment and invent new dishes before they were served to the Sultan. Here they developed what we know today as Turkish coffee. Coffee beans were roasted over a fire, ground into a powder using flourmills, then mixed with water and cooked slowly over ashes. The result was a thick, syrupy and aromatic beverage that was delicious.”

Now. Onto the good stuff…

According to Arat Turkish coffee:

  • Remains on the palate longer than any other type of coffee due to its velvet-like texture.
  • Remains hot for a long time because of the foam, which acts as a lid for several minutes after coffee has been poured.
  • Cools much more slowly than other varieties of coffee as it is served in thin porcelain cups, thus prolonging the drinking pleasure.
  • Has an unforgettable flavour thanks to the thick, syrupy consistency that stimulates the taste buds.
  • Is thicker and more aromatic than other kinds of coffee.

His guide can be found at Bean Scene. It’s pretty similar to mine. But worth a read.

I’m going to try making some – and then I’ll post a video of the results.

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